Jorge's Quest For Knowledge!

All You Need To Know About Identity And Security On-Premises And In The Cloud. It's Just Like An Addiction, The More You Have, The More You Want To Have!

(2007-07-19) User Account Control From The Command Line

Posted by Jorge on 2007-07-19


Although categorized as Windows Server, it also applies to Windows Vista.

Let’s say you have a script (CMD, VBS, PS, etc.) that you want to execute from some tool. If you use an account that is a member of the administrators group, but it is not the default administrator account, you may have a challenge to solve! What would you do?

This feature is not available by default. Have no fear and stop screwing around trying.😉

Read the following: Script Elevation PowerToys for Windows Vista

Cheers,
Jorge
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One Response to “(2007-07-19) User Account Control From The Command Line”

  1. […] What’s the difference? Probably you will say that DSADD throws in an "Access Denied" while you are a member of the Domain Admins group. What happens here is that DSADD apparently is not UAC aware and does not invoke the UAC Window to ask for consent to elevate the privileges to perform the action. You receive an access denied because the privileges are not elevated. To be honest I say this is a bug because the DSADD utility should behave like the NTDSUTIL utility. I reported this to Microsoft. So how can you still execute the DSADD command until this has been repaired? A few options are available: (1) Open an elevated command prompt window with the "Run as administrator" option (2) Open a normal command prompt window and use the elevation script as described here. […]

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